One Night Ultimate Werewolf

Game Night: Imagine, One Night Ultimate Werewolf, and Broom Service

We had a quick game night last week, during which we introduced two games to our usual game night friends, both Imagine, which I’ve reviewed on Board of Life, and One Night Ultimate Werewolf, which we have wanted since playing it for the first time at Replay Fx. It was also the first time in a good while that we played board games with the kids. We also played Broom Service, which we haven’t played in a little while.

Dinner was spaghetti, salad, and garlic bread, and our friends also opened some home brewed wine that was as sweet and good as any regional wine I’ve tried. It reminded me of some of Lonz’s desert wines, although much stronger.

Imagine


My first takeaway from playing Imagine for the first time on someone else’s table is that though it has no board, Imagine takes up a larger section of your table than most board games. While the rules depict two circles of transparent Imagine cards, we ended up with three very large circles, and then had to spread them out even more to make the game play area in the middle.

The table also presented some resistance to the transparent cards, or rather, lack of resistance. We initially dealt out the cards on the table surface, but the plastic Imagine cards, due to a combination of thinness and slipperiness, not only were hard to pry from the natural wood, but also slid right onto the floor several times. So my friend put down the card game overlay that he built with craft materials, as it is softer, more textured, and an easier surface from which to play card games.

Which presented a new problem, as the predominantly blue, Star Wars themed, overlay and the dim light had the effect of obscuring the images on the clear cards. So, add to my game play criticism in my review of Imagine that this game has environmental limitations that stem from its components. There are other scenarios that immediately come to mind that would be averse to playing Imagine—this isn’t a game that you would take camping, for instance, unless you had a bright white tablecloth and a very powerful light either inside or outside your camper or tent. Fans of Imagine may want to have a coarse white tablecloth handy, or a white overlay similar to the one my friend built, for play indoors.

This was the first game of the night, and the kids didn’t jump in until the next game, but this was still our first time playing Imagine with four players, as we had only played with three beforehand. Which brings me to my second takeaway–that Imagine seems to improve with more players at the table. While an extra person playing Enigmas didn’t make much of a difference to game play, an extra person guessing made it much more competitive. So while I maintain that Imagine is a suitable game for tabletop sessions that have a low player count, it can have a more exciting dynamic with additional players.

Also, comparing this game with the one we played next creates a very stark contrast in terms of replay value. While everyone enjoyed Imagine, no one wanted to play it again immediately thereafter, despite it being a fairly short game. One play through was enough to satisfy everyone at the table.

One Night Ultimate Werewolf


One Night Ultmate Werewolf, on the other hand, we played twice with just the adults and then five times with the kids included. I’m planning on reviewing this one later on Board of Life, so I’m going to save my analysis of the game itself for later. You know, the intrinsic stuff, such as how you play it, how you win, strategic analysis, if any, and why it’s fun as an activity or any good as a game–which are separate criteria, we’ve learned, from our examination of Imagine. You won’t find any of that here. What follows are just some notes on some of One Night Ultimate Werewolf’s extrinsic values, specifically that it’s easy to learn, it bridges all ages, and it has a ton of replay value.

In terms of learnability, One Night Ultimate Werewolf can be played by anyone that can speak, and although it can be played better by those that have mastered some social subterfuge, it has almost no learning curve until some of the more complicated roles are added to the mix. The first time we played it with our friends, it was just us four adults, and we simply played the One Night App with the recommended seven roles for beginners’ play and told everyone to listen carefully for their role and do exactly what the voice said. Then we played again, and then we recruited the kids for an eight player game.

The kids had a great time playing it, which led to us playing five games in a row with them and speaks not only to the fact that One Night Ultimate Werewolf is exemplary all-ages entertainment, but also that it has very high replay value. It isn’t that each game of ONUW is dramatically different, as while you can swap out role cards here and there, the game experience is essentially the same each time: listen to the narrator, do what it says, and, in the discovery phase, either shoot the werewolves or, if you’re the werewolf, try not to get shot. When you open the box, ONUW looks customizable, but that assumption turns out to be merely a cosmetic one. So why can’t gamers play just one game of ONUW? Because that game experience, despite its ongoing homogeneity, is simply that fun and addictive. Only time will tell as to whether ONUW will age poorly, and as Bezier Games continues to toss expansions to One Night fans, the dust may take a long time to settle.

Broom Service

I’ve discussed Broom Service in one review and two (here’s one; here’s two) previous Game Night recaps, and I don’t have a lot to add. However, our friends’ daughter has been wanting to play games with us, and she did sit in on this one, which not only made it a five player game with no bewitched cards, it also gives us another opportunity to examine tabletop games and their intersection with the small set.

So how does Broom Service mix with kids? Both of our daughters are pre-tweens and a year apart; my daughter—who occasionally likes to play Settlers of Catan and Puerto Rico, and watches Tabletop—does not like to play it, and their daughter—whose favorite board game is Machi Koro—had to be strongly encouraged to stay at the table and be prompted to take her turn. Honestly, both of these girls are probably more interested in tablet games, but both of them are fans of certain tabletop games, and with a concept like witches delivering potions, you would think that Broom Service would be able to crossover to that age demographic. Why it does not is puzzling to me, especially in the case of my daughter, who loves Kiki’s Delivery Service and Harry Potter and for whom Broom Service seems made to order.

That said, Broom Service may have a higher age range than you would think, as the game is currently 0:2 with the pre-tweens in our gaming group.

Conclusion

Overall, this was a pretty good game night, with its high point being seven games of One Night Ultimate Werewolf. Honestly, I’m suprised that I like One Night Ultimate Werewolf as much as I do, as I prefer more strategic games. This may be because ONUW is successful at relating its premise and concept with every single round, unlike many other games with more complicated staging that lose their way at times somewhere in the mid-game. On the other hand, while I have some admiration to Imagine’s design and concept—make the inscrutable imaginable and, ultimately, recognizable—the game’s shortcomings become more and more apparent with each play. Lastly, I discovered that while I find Broom Service to be a pleasant diceless refuge from Catan, younger gamers in my orbit do not like it.

Imagine

One Night Ultimate Werewolf

Broom Service – Strategy Game

Board of Life uses affiliate links. Gamewright sent a review copy of Imagine.

Game Review: Gamewright’s Imagine (2016)

While Gamewright is a publisher of what are ostensibly family games that you can play with your kids, perhaps because many of their games aim to cultivate the mind, they have found a wider audience of all-ages that enjoy stimulating tabletop games. In this household, we’re already fans of three eminently intriguing and mentally nourishing games, not only Dragonwood, which I’ve previously reviewed, but also Forbidden Island and Forbidden Desert.

Our most recent acquisition from Gamewright is Imagine, a game that dropped just this month during GenCon. It is described in its press sheet as a game that “transcends language and culture…which came to us from Japan via our French publishing partners” and allows players to “combine, overlap, and even animate the special transparent cards” in order to “convey your chosen subject without saying a word.” These are bold and ambitious promises, and Gamewright makes good on them with this curiously amusing card game.

To set up Imagine, you simply put all 61 transparent cards in a series of circles on your tabletop, so that all players can easily see them. Then you shuffle the Enigma cards, and place those and the score tokens within easy reach of everyone.

Here’s how you play one round of Imagine. On your turn, you grab an Enigma* card, which has eight different enigmas with corresponding clues. Any other player then tells you a number between one and eight to determine the enigma of that round, you provide the other players the associated clue, and then the hinting and the guessing begin. At this point, you can use any of the transparent cards, in any quantity, to communicate your hint. If no one gets it, you can build onto that hint, or you can scrap it and start over, whichever you prefer. There’s no set time limit either, and the players can decide when they’ve had enough. If no one guesses correctly, then no one scores, but if someone does grok what you’re trying to do, both that player and you get one point. Yes, Imagine rewards both good hinters and good guessers, which can encourage a quick game.

As for a more specific example of play, first take a look at a sample Enigma card:

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When this card game up during a game, someone called “six,” so that my enigma was “hula hoop,” and their clue was “Sports and Leisure.”  I only needed two cards here, and the hinter and I scored after about five seconds.

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No, it isn’t a perfect hint—there are only 61 transparent cards after all, so your selection of imagery is limited. I had wanted someone to call “five” so I could play these three cards as “Captain America”:

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These two are probably among the easiest enigmas in the game. More than most games, Imagine has a learning curve, as while there is a limited arsenal of symbols, there are still 61 different cards to absorb.  As the Imagine “alphabet” is learned, the game will become quicker as the players will be able to rely on a more articulate memory of the cards and not play “hunt and peck” as they pore over and over again looking for cards they don’t yet know by heart. After my first time playing this game, my second thought was the hope that there will be expansion packs with additional transparent cards, as 61 shapes are not enough for some enigmas. (My first thought was that I was looking forward to introducing this to other friends that play tabletop games.)

Three to eight players can play Imagine, and I can tell you that unlike games that break down in games with a low player count (I’m looking at you, Spyfall), my wife, daughter, and I played a very satisfying three player game. Footage of our game play could have been used for a TV commercial, as there was a lot of laughing, loud banter, hilarious clues, and amusing guesses.

I really only have one criticism of Imagine.  The game rewards bad hinters and bad guessers, not just good guessers and good hinters.  However, this flaw may assist the game in securing mass appeal, as  it levels the playing field.

You see, Imagine doesn’t end until every player provides two good hints that are guessed correctly by another player. In one game, a player provided two good hints within three moves (the seventh play overall), while it took six moves (the fifteenth play over all) for the player whose second hint ended the game. The superior hinter hit the hint quota early, and would have won if the game ended then; the inefficient hinter didn’t meet the quota until eight plays later, and because the game ended at that moment, the bad hinter scored the game point with her second good hint. Hence, Imagine rewards bad hinters by letting them enjoy a prolonged game with more scoring opportunities, as well as one of the two points given out in the final scoring opportunity.

As to rewarding bad guessers, this same player, instead of using thoughtful guessing, would throw out dozens of guesses at the rate of two a second, using the “throw everything until something sticks” strategy.  This scattergun approach is as effective as you would expect, and, pragmatically speaking, more effective than thoughtful guessing when the thoughtful guesser is drawing a blank.  Twenty bad guesses have a better chance of getting a right answer than no good guesses at all.

The bad news for those that like the casual analytics of tabletop gaming, or even those that overcome the learning curve involved with grasping the language of 61 symbols in Imagine, is that their acumen will not be much of an advantage over the bad hinters and bad guessers. The good news is that if you’re bad at hinting and guessing, you may still do well at Imagine, and you even get a slight advantage in being one of the two final scorers in a game.

As Imagine not only has a strong premise, enjoyable game play, high replay value, and a level playing field, its potential audience is huge, and I expect Imagine to have strong word of mouth that will sell hundreds of thousands of copies.

Footnotes

*”I, Enigma” is also an anagram of Imagine, which may or may not have influenced the translators during their localization of the game.


Imagine

Gamewright sent a review copy of Imagine. Board of Life uses affiliate links. Cross-posted on NerdSpan.com.